The Art of Subcontracting

By: Elisa Leichty Posted in Freelance Tips, Meeting Recaps, Resources

If you missed our meeting on “The Art of Subcontracting,” no need to worry. We have notes for you from our speakers Dana Marruffo & LuAnn Glowacz. In fact, from now on you can find a summary of each Freelance Austin monthly meeting here on our blog!

Freelance Austin | The Art of Subcontracting

The Art of Subcontracting: Advice from Dana Marruffo & LuAnn Glowacz

June 11, 2014

 Freelance Austin | The Art of Subcontracting

Hire a Subcontractor to:

  • Help You Do What You Do (But More of It)
  • Provide Expertise/Services You Don’t (Widen Your Breadth of Services)

Great Subcontractors:

  • Carry Out Another’s Vision/Strategy
  • Are the Grease in the Wheel
  • Are Discreet With Clients
  • Are Highly Intuitive and Adaptable
  • Can Provide Enthusiastically Happy References

How to Subcontract Like a Champ:

  • Be Clear (About What You Do & Don’t Do)
  • Make Friends (With EVERYONE – Inside and Outside Your Field)
  • Talk Money (Agree in Writing: Your Rates, Who/When You’ll Invoice, and Scope of Work)
  • Learn IRS Rules and Regulations to Avoid Employee Misclassification
  • Maintain a Reliable, Consistent Process
  • Don’t Put All Your Eggs into One Basket (Diversify Your Client Load)

Keep in Mind (as a Subcontractor):

  • YOU Are Not Top Dog – You Are There to Make Your Contractor Look Good
  • Your Quality of Work is Everything. Don’t Expect Your Contractor to “Fix It”
  • Do What You Were Hired to Do – Nothing More, Nothing Less
  • You’re Not Locked Into One Rate for Everyone, Forever. Ask Your Contractors to Check With You First Before Assuming Your Rate on a Proposal or Renewed Contract
  • Subcontracting Your Subcontracted Work is Possible, But Be Honest With Your Contractor

Before Working With a Subcontractor:

  • Articulate Your/You Client’s Needs and Expectations
  • Have a Subcontractor Agreement in Place and Ready to Sign
  • Get a W9 From Your Subcontractor (During Tax Time, Issue a 1099 if $600 or More is Paid)
  • Be Sure Your Subcontractor Has Other Clients (Not Solely Dependent on You for Work), Minimize Amount of Time They Work Onsite, Etc. to Avoid Employee Misclassification
  • Be Open to the New Ideas and Fresh Best Practices the Subcontractor Brings to the Table
 
What are your tips and tricks for subcontracting? Tell us below.

 


(Post originally contributed by Freelance Austin member Chloe Scheller.)

Elisa Leichty

Chief Everything at Leichty Creative
Elisa is the PR & Marketing Chair for Freelance Austin and runs Leichty Creative, a one-woman creative studio for small businesses & new ideas.

Latest posts by Elisa Leichty (see all)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *